First to post

Anything to do with programming games...
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Old Man Johnson
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First to post

Post by Old Man Johnson » Thu Apr 21, 2005 2:22 pm

Sean, you program mostly in C, correct? Is it difficult to do?
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BoxZone_Author
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Post by BoxZone_Author » Thu Apr 21, 2005 9:53 pm

That question is a bit like asking "Is it difficult to write a novel in English".

It's difficult to write a good game in C. It's relatively easy to write a simple one.
Most of what I write is in C too, it's a lot easier than the stuff Sean writes but it's not as good either.

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Post by sid6.7 » Fri Apr 22, 2005 3:05 am

a good place to start is with basic or qbasic
making something real simple...

probably the easiest to do is make some
kinda text program where you enter in a value
and get a random result each time...
if you run..you'll only die tired

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Re: First to post

Post by Sean OConnor » Fri Apr 22, 2005 7:43 am

Old Man Johnson wrote:Sean, you program mostly in C, correct? Is it difficult to do?
Yes, I use C. I've never seen the need or advantage to program in C++ with objects but that's what most people seem to learn these days. I started off with assembly language so I haven't got a problem with pointers or array overruns which are the most common difficulties with C.

If you want any easier language to learn to program with try Visual Basic.

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Post by OrigamiGuy » Fri Apr 22, 2005 1:54 pm

The way most college programming courses seem to start off nowadays is with object-oriented stuff, then some fourth-generation language with extras heaped on. My university does Java first, as a primer for C++.

I have to say that Java is infinitely useful, but only as a stepping stone to learn how to think in object-oriented modes. Once that gets into your head (class inheritance, methods and all that jazz) then I believe it's by far the most powerful method out there. I've programmed in Visual Basic, C, C++, Java, and a smattering of Pascal. I even did a little assembly programming for the Zilog Z80 processor, found in most Texas Instruments graphing calculators. Out of all the stuff I've worked on, C++ is definitely the best, and the one I would recommend starting on. Don't get hooked into a procedural language when you can dive right into an object-oriented one from the start.

Bloodshed Dev-C++ is a great IDE/Compiler, and it's free! Also, if you need a fun excuse to learn object methods and want to see fast results, play Robocode.
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Old Man Johnson
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Post by Old Man Johnson » Fri Apr 22, 2005 6:22 pm

Thanks everybody.
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Post by Legacy » Fri Apr 22, 2005 7:25 pm

I only know VB, and I'm no expert in that, but I've got several books on C and one on C++ just waiting for me to stare them down.

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Post by Old Man Johnson » Thu Apr 28, 2005 6:29 pm

Is it difficult to write a novel in English?
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Post by Legacy » Fri Apr 29, 2005 12:25 am

No, but to write a good one takes the Frank Herberts, Tolkiens, and Heinleins of the world to write a great novel, just as it takes a gifted programmer and all-around thinker, much like Sean, to make a good game. I've got a mid-level gaming rig, and games from Empire Earth to Halo, yet I find myself spending 90% of my gaming time playing CM, Slay, and Conquest. I own Civ 3 and the expansions, so what do I do? I think to myself "Do I want to mess with a week of Civ 3 just to conquer the world again?" then I load up Mother of all Battles. I find it ironic that a gaming package I spent $40 USD on gets ten to twenty times the play time as the hundreds, possibly thousands, of dollars of games I've bought over the years. The only rival to these games in my gaming library is StarCraft: Brood War. I think it says something for the true value of gameplay. All of the newer 3D strategy games tire me, but games like this with good gameplay and minimal graphics fill the need for a good, fun game.

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Post by Old Man Johnson » Fri Apr 29, 2005 12:42 am

Brood War is great. I also love how it runs on my crappy computer as well as my good one.
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Post by OrigamiGuy » Fri Apr 29, 2005 6:47 pm

Brood War is one of the great equalizers of the gaming world. If you rock at Brood War, you just rock. I wasn't a fan of Warcraft III, though. Warcraft II was much more fun to play.

I agree with Legacy on this one. A great game is all about fun, not graphics or extras. Everyone has a different idea of fun. I jumped for joy when all the abandonware sites started getting publicity across the net. I've been playing stuff like the Leisure Suit Larry series and X-Com, Civilization 1, and I even found all my favorite Commander Keen games.
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Post by Old Man Johnson » Sat Apr 30, 2005 12:12 am

Graphics can certinly help a game look really good, but if it's not fun, it doesn't matter how good it looks because you won't be playing it.

Interesting how this turned into a discussion on what's good in a game...
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Post by Legacy » Sat Apr 30, 2005 7:59 pm

I'm a fan of a lot of old DOS games that few people I know have ever played, probably because I had an AT&T 6300 when I was a kid and played Beast and Elite, and Might and Magic: Secret of the Inner Sanctum, as well as a bunch of others, like the Kroz series. Anyway, my attraction to Sean's games is mostly because they have an older, simpler feel to them, but especially in Critical Mass, there are so many different ways to use what is at hand to accomplish your ends.

And from my experience with forums, topics are only accurate until someone posts.

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THEIF

Post by The Truth » Sun Jun 19, 2005 3:37 am

Old Man Johnson wants to learn C languange so he can start his own website and build cheap spin-off games like: Slain, Brother of All Battles, Critial Weight, The Captian, Firebattle, End of the Island, and Football with Dinosaurs. Sean O Conner and others must not teach or refer Johnson to programming websites or he will put this site out of buissness. BEWARE
Read the OMERGA FILE. Learn the truth

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Legacy
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Post by Legacy » Sun Jun 19, 2005 5:54 am

The Captain sounds cool... maybe a naval comobat game like Critical Mass, but on a larger scale so we can simulate the battle fo Trafalgar?

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