New Question

Real time World War II combat simulation
Post Reply
Ezekiel
Posts: 22
Joined: Fri Feb 22, 2008 4:54 pm

New Question

Post by Ezekiel » Sat Feb 23, 2008 1:33 am

I need to know why arty takes so long?when im playin,by the time arty hits my men have already overran that position and it lands on my troops!
Arty even takes long when i request at the same place!I play using my brother's copy of firefight he says its because the crew needs to ajust the firing angle.My brother lies alot and my sister has no clue(Well,she's a girl!)
Does any one know the real reason?

User avatar
Legacy
Posts: 664
Joined: Thu Feb 17, 2005 4:34 pm
Location: Wellsboro, PA, USA
Contact:

Re: New Question

Post by Legacy » Sat Feb 23, 2008 7:21 am

Ezekiel wrote:I need to know why arty takes so long?when im playin,by the time arty hits my men have already overran that position and it lands on my troops!
Arty even takes long when i request at the same place!I play using my brother's copy of firefight he says its because the crew needs to ajust the firing angle.My brother lies alot and my sister has no clue(Well,she's a girl!)
Does any one know the real reason?


World War II predates the modern digital battlefield. Odds are, you are just one company on a wide front, being supported by one battery, which pretty much has to take fire support orders as they come. Further, they have to check maps and aiming carefully as to avoid friendly fire, then generally walk round in to a target, with a forward observer confirming and adjusting. That forward observer is, depending on the nation, time, and situation possibly the officer in charge, and is doing a few other things at once, and in either case is using primitive radio equipment and a paper map under adverse battlefield conditions.
"Every man is my superior in that I may learn from him."

Don't take life too seriously, you won't make it out alive!

Andy Brown
Posts: 262
Joined: Wed Dec 08, 2004 9:30 am
Location: Christchurch, New Zealand

Re: New Question

Post by Andy Brown » Sat Feb 23, 2008 11:11 am

Ezekiel wrote:I need to know why arty takes so long?


Actually, with the exception of certain historical examples that involve a lot of preliminary artillery fire planning, the artillery response in Firefight is blindingly fast compared to "real life".

IIRC, it takes only 2 & 1/2 minutes from the call for fire until the first spotting round is on the way. The only way that's going to happen in real life is if the target has already been pre-recorded and the gun line already has the necessary target data. It takes only 9 seconds after a Firefight arty spotting round has splashed for a correction to be calculated and a new round sent on its way. Even if the observer and the plotter back at the artillery command post were connected by telepathy, that's still an impossibly short time for the correction to be plotted, new data issued and the spotting gun to be adjusted and fired.

Now, Firefight games tend to occur much faster than in real life for a whole lot of reasons so the abbreviated artillery waiting time is not too out of place in the game. Many times I, too, have sweated that 4 & 1/2 minutes from my call for fire until the the first salvo lands but unrealistically long it is not.

However, it should be possible to "REPEAT" the last mission (ie fire again at the same spot) with almost no delay but, unfortunately, Firefight isn't that sophisticated.

Cheers,

Andy Brown

JeanBoule
Posts: 117
Joined: Mon May 14, 2007 9:10 am
Location: L'Australie

Arty Response, Speed of the game.

Post by JeanBoule » Sat Feb 23, 2008 1:24 pm

Good answer Andy. I skim through every book I see looking for this sort of information. It is amazing how hard some of it is to find. Books often have chapters full of minute detail about the hardware, but only a few pages (if any) about the process. For example, Ian V Hogg, whom I greatly admire as a writer on artillery matters, will only very rarely state how many rounds per minute, or hour, a particular gun type was capable of. He stated in one book that at the beginning of WWI, the gunnery process was hardly different from the Napoleonic era. Guns fired directly at targets of opportunity, controlled in batteries by their own officers who observed for themselves. The process changed out of sight over the next four years, developing into inflexible programs of fire for attack, and somewhat quicker response systems for defence. When the "stormtroop" tactics came in in 1917/18, they required something much more responsive to the infantry's needs, so they used smaller, lighter pieces which could closely accompany the infantry, under their direct control. That control mostly had to be voice messages.
I don't think most people realize that even during WWII, most armies did not have reliable, portable radios down to company level, let alone platoon level, which is needed for anything like rapid artillery response and effective control of sub-units at a distance. As for sections (squads) changing tasks in mid-battle, that meant a personal visit by a commander, or sending a messenger. It is really a wonder to me how they got anything done at all.
cheers.
Voila du boudin!

Ezekiel
Posts: 22
Joined: Fri Feb 22, 2008 4:54 pm

Post by Ezekiel » Sat Feb 23, 2008 4:47 pm

THX for the reply guys.

Post Reply